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the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
to everyone down there in times square, all across america. did you say it was an experiment with the dogs right there? >> all i can think of is my dog behind the wheel, what a mistake. >> that isn't happening with my dog. >>> and a look at lara. she is live in london this morning. >>> we also have the latest on the prank call to the hospital ward. >>> we also have the latest on the showdown in d.c. on our taxes and that fast-approaching fiscal cliff. president obama has rejected the latest republican offer. he's taking a very hard line in the talks. >>> there's growing outage here in new york city over a front-page photo from "the new york post" yesterday. this man has just fallen down on the tracks. is just seconds away from a subway train hitting and killing him. many people upset why the photographer was taking the picture and not helping the man. this morning, he's talking out, justifying why he took the photo. and why so many other folks were running away. there's nobody there trying to help him off the tracks. >> he says he was trying to help. we're going to get into that. >>> also,
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
giving more money to the least competent people in america, the politicians in washington. you're talking about giving them the extra money so they could have bigger government. the fact that they're taking that money frommus in a less bad way i suppose that is good news but we're still taking one step after another in the wrong direction. at the end of that journey the destination is greece or spain or italy. melissa: right. >> we have to figure out how to get control of intitlements. the while house refuses to have adult conversation about that. melissa: neither of these proposals, neither side gets us closer to closing the enormous gap you're talking about. i say over and over again and if this was your household and bills were so far out of line with what the revenue was you could get very serious very quickly. these people do not seem to do that. for republicans is it looking more and more palatable to go over the cliff at this point? >> depends on how dogmatic obama is. like selling a car on craig's list and put it up for 5,000 and really take 4500. someone offers you 4,000. this is
. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? indicated up 14 points. unable to hold on to the gains we saw yesterday
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
are kind of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent . part of the bargain let's get america off of a far more dangerous drug than corn or ethanoyl. it hurts food shoppers and tears up the inside of the engine. >> two wrongs don't make a right. what john was referring to was windmills in places like norway. >> and holland. >> and what is happening the wind sector took off in norway and in denmark. at the same time gerald ford and carter were pushing shell gas development. >> and that was viable. >> and that is 50 percent of what is going on in wind energy and equals the price . you net out 15 percent of the oil. are we making these companies economically profitable or if not. they should be killed off and otherwise we are padding the profits. morgan, you still like solar and what about wind. >> the price of that is coming down. wind energy let is it lapse and slash and born corn sib sidies. going back to wind. it is 8,000 percent higher than the cost of natural gas for the same amount of electrical lout put. >> i agree with her on this. >> what is more interesting is what liz sai
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
gabbers. >> brian: he is one of america's favorite coach. his career almost ended early and fans had no idea. the coach revealed something for the very first time. by the way. "fox and friends" starts now. ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> steve: you must be conflicted today. >> brian: in what way? >> steve: we have coach k on and any time we have peitro, the super model who has been a friend of your manies, many years. >> brian: i am looking forward to nick rangon. >> gretchen: you will have to duke me out for it then. >> brian: you start with him in 10 minutes. >> gretchen: you want to trade coach for nick it will coach you. >> brian: and edrolins to be named later. >> gretchen: and i always like rolins. >> brian: pet up with us. she was a young super model. >> gretchen: does she know she was off your list. >> brian: not a world. can we agree as well that is our secret. >> steve: she doesn't have to know. we have a busy three hours starting with a fox news alert. >> gretchen: we have one out of carey. president mursi returning, mohammed that is returning to the palace. he took off amid
on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness started. certainly no sign of anything last friday when kate was playing hockey in high heels. nor had there been any hint of what was the county -- was to come a couple of days earlier. william was presented with a baby gift. doctors say severe sickness that such an early stage should not be a cause for early concerned -- because of concern -- be a cause of concern. >> it is a difficult time for them to be going
meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting the place where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who could afford to escape the city heat and spend summers
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
. the hair on the back of my neck stood up, and i thought, there is no way that in america that this could happen. and i spoke out at that time, "you can't do that to us." and then he said, "yes, i can." i said, "that's not legal." and he came back with, "yes, it is." >> and it was. in the state of michigan, there is no law that prevents a boss from firing people virtually at will. at weyco, that meant no smoking at work, no smoking at home, no smoking period. >> good afternoon. weyco. >> weyco gave employees 15 months to quit, then they were subject to random nicotine testing. you fail, you're out. >> did either of you say, "okay, this is awful, but, you know, this is a chance to break the habit?" >> i did. i tried to quit smoking. i took advantage of their program, the smoking cessation program. but i was unsuccessful. >> i'm trying every way to cut down, quit--gum. i'm trying, yes, on my own, but i don't need an employer to do that. >> i pay the bills around here, so i'm gonna set the expectations. >> howard weyers is the boss, some would say tyrant, of weyco. >> what's important? this
now sent the white house their own plan for getting america's finances under control. but both sides still far apart. abc's jake tapper is covering this from the white house. jake, the white house downplayed this new offer but will it be enough to jump-start negotiations? >> reporter: i don't think so, george. the white house advisers describe the proposal that republicans offered yesterday, as a step backward in terms of negotiations. what the outlying house republican states is $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction. that includes 1.2 trillion in spending cuts. $800 billion in new revenue. optimistic projections. and $200 billion in other measures, such as adjusting the consumer price index. but house republicans say if the president doesn't like this, it's incumbent upon him to offer a plan that can make it through the house and the senate. >> the white house says they want to see the republicans first say that tax rates are going to go up. is there any prospect of a face-to-face meeting between the president and house speaker john boehner in the coming days? and how are they getting
: but this is a historic reversal. look i've been in america 40 years and started out in san francisco 40 years ago and back in those days, there was always a net migration into california, significant numbers. california gained tens of millions of people over my time in america, but that just recently has been completely reversed. now there's a net leaving of people. and that's historic in america, that's historic. >> it is historic. it is historic because you come here, as i said for the weather, but that's it anymore and there's no promise of a future. don't promise that you're going to be able to put down your stake and really do something with it. look at the head of facebook, one of the partners left not only the state of california, left the united states of america because of the taxes going on in this state and in the united states of america itself. so, again, there's no incentive to stay in the state because you were so punished, if in fact you do have the state. if you're a young couple trying to raise a family into the public school system and the public school system is in the tank an
visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
there is a great middle out there that makes of america. the more we reflect the middle, the better off our committee will be and i think the service we provide will be better. >> what gives you that hope? >> a lot of people are recognizing the pathway we are on will not help. more and more members are talking with me where we discuss with one another how we can improve the place. i hear it almost every day. i encourage it. >> there are people who believe partisanship is a good thing because ideology and the direction of the country moves in the way they want. for example, people have come in with the tea party. what do you think of these hyper-partisan groups outside of the congress that attempt to exert their influence? >> one of the more fascinating experience i have had involves a gathering. my first meeting a couple years ago, with tea party types. my staff was concerned about this new group. i said, give me their telephone numbers. i invited them to our session. they were there that evening to express their concern about health care being nationalized and taking over that piece of the
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
-- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their going what would it be like if all of your fans were jerks? wouldn't that tell you something? if all of your fans -- i can't swear in the reagan library but if they were jerks, what if you were bi
of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show. and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, so we would take family vacations across
jarrett in for bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom.". >> i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum the senate gavels in at 11:00 a.m. we'll see if there was some miracle overnight. gregg: i doubt that. yesterday, republican senate leader mitch mcconnell made an emergency call to the vice president joe biden in an evident to jump-start negotiations. heather: if no deal is haed out today, majority leader reid says he will call a vote on a separate white house plan that reflects's original proposal. gregg: chief correspondent mike emanuel kicks off the coverage. mike, where do the things stand in the fiscal cliff talks at this critical late-stage? >> reporter: gregg, there seems to be some hope that conversations between vice president joe biden and senator mitch mcconnell can produce a deal. aides say the two men spoke multiple times last night and will continue working toward a solution. mcconnell called the vice. president bush: after weighing 18 hours from senate majority leader harry reid who seemed to throw in the towel. >> there is still significant difference between two
the opportunity and skirted up. -- screwed it up. >> we have two chinese immigrant families representing america. it is hard to imagine it in reverse from the chinese side. they're not an immigrant-based society. >> do they take it as an honor? >> yes. they also want to claim him. you know, as part of the greater china community. and then there is a bit of a disappointment, but it is an amazing moment in american history. >> i guess you want over there just before or after the big confrontation in august over the debt crisis. what has been their view of how our political system is working, whether we are worthy partner? >> the views of a top chinese government leaders is to have great confidence in the u.s. economy. they have made those statements to the top american leaders that have gone, all the way from vice president biden, and xi jinping met with president obama in february of last year. they expressed great confidence in united states. they're always asking about how the recovery is going. they believe that we will get our fiscal house in order. they know how dependent they are, and that
as americans coming from the same place. we all want to live in a safer america. we just differ on how to achieve that. where i think the mark is being missed, and for give the pun, is that i feel like the discussion needs to be about the madness, not about the method. so, let's focus on violence as a topic, certainly, guns is one point of discussion, but i think that there is a broader discussion to be had. but nobody can make any progress until we take some of the emotion out of it. and think about it holistically, we don't want to have unintended consequences and fix one thing and break another, and i think that's where the challange is. the good news we all want to live in a safe america, we need to talk about the best way to achieve that. stuart: that's unbelievely retrained from you, carol. i unleashed earlier on the program against piers morgan and were you restrained. i appreciate that. >> now what, stuart? i'm starting a new party in in america, i'm calling it the common sense party. if you'd like to join me, this is my-- one of my first forays in the common sense party. stuar
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
-american communities and drugging them up for each other? >> bob: they help arm america. yes. >> dana: why do you think the police told not to drive? he was a danger to society, because he was drunk. if he got in the bentley then the bentley could have been used as a murder weapon. that's what he would have gotten done for if he had driven a car. jason whitlock doesn't talk about the personal responsibility that belcher has. then it's our fault. how is it our fault that he -- he was on drugs. had troubled past. we brought up this morning the things -- he had anger management issues. this goes to the mental health, dealing with the anger and sudden fame and all of a sudden you have this money. it can't be my fault he made that decision. >> eric: it's not your fault. >> bob: it's the people with problems -- >> greg: like that. >> dana: he based, the cops let him off because he was like that. he was wealthy, famous, part of a great team and they wanted him to be suck sus elf. >> eric: like that is the constitutional fright own a gun. >> greg: when you hear the chuckleheads talk they use the phrase "gun cu
and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same ti that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you have enough breathing room to prosper. over time if government grows faster than a private sector that wedge means the burden of gdp, it is not like one straw causes it to collapse, but there is a tipping point*. are we five years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good intentions and that go bad. clean energy'
the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services to an expanding population. next slide, please. the current funding formula for the older americans act, it is primarily based on age before title b and c and 7, the share of population age 60 and older, and for title 3e, the share of population which is 70 or older. the act also provide a minimal level of funding for each state. no state can receive less than half a percent in total appropriation. in 2012 these numbers were about 5.9 million and title seven, $108,000 respectively. the law also includes a provision, each state will receive a least as much as in the prior fiscal year. while the federal formula is based on age, the older americans act requires state programs to target prioritized services to that population with the greatest economic and social needs. these include factors like poverty, living at or below the poverty level,
proprietary not in a bad way that in a quite paternal because they cared about the definition of america and the survival and success of america. they did that what drove jefferson this case is the fear that would be swallowed up as a free of the revolution virtually in the world had been by the forces of reaction. i argue in the book that it's impossible life and to understand early american history without seeing the period between the end of the french and indian war and 7063 and the end of the war in 1815 as a 50 year war with britain sometimes hot and sometimes cold but always there. in precise analogy but it would be writing about washington, adams, jefferson, hamilton without reference to this struggle. i think would be like riding but truman, eisenhower, kennedy, johnson, nixon, ford, carter, ronald reagan and not mentioning the soviet union. the foreign policy was that significant and his domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is that they did. so you win the argument. the war of 1812
in america and deep spending cuts particularly to our military. top lawmakers are calling in staff members for meetings on this saturday. right now we are told senate leaders are working on a potential deal. still our journalists on the hill are being told there will be no official proposals or votes until tomorrow at the very earliest. the time line qoo -- could not be tighter. we will begin seeing lower tax rates expiring and federal aid for things like unemployment checks. here is a statistic for you. if there is no deal in place for january 1st, those benefits, those unemployment benefits will no longer be authorized. the law project estimates some two million americans will stop receiving benefits after december 29th. that's today. many experts fear going over the cliff could send our weak economy plunging back into a recession. president obama says he remains optimistic, but he says no bargain could be reached in congress, then congress must vote on his back up plan to block taxes for anybody making less than $250,000 a year. chief congressional correspondent mike emmanuel has more.
combination of higher taxes on just about every worker in america and deep spending cuts particularly to our military. top lawmakers are calling in staff members for meetings on this saturday. right now we are told senate leaders are working on a potential deal. still our journalists on the hill are being told there will be no official proposals or votes until tomorrow at the very earliest. the time line qoo -- could not be tighter. we will begin seeing lower tax rates expiring and federal aid for things like unemployment checks. here is a statistic for you. if there is no deal in place for january 1st, those benefits, those unemployment benefits will no longer be authorized. the law project estimates some two million americans will stop receiving benefits after december 29th. that's today. many experts fear going over the cliff could send our weak economy plunging back into a recession. president obama says he remains optimistic, but he says no bargain could be reached in congress, then congress must vote on his back up plan to block taxes for anybody making less than $250,000 a year. chief
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and asia and in poverty. johnson relucta
.01%, it amounted to about 4.2 million per family. so when you think about why is there this polarization in america, why are there these very different views about the world, you know, part of it is there are very different worlds that people are inhabits. having said that, so, you know, my premise is this isn't just a case of the rich have always been with us. something really different is happening, and it's important for us to talk about it, to research it, to figure out what's going on. but actually, there is a real reluctance, and i have admit particularly here in america, and i'm canadian, so i see you guys with a little bit of a distance. [laughter] particularly in america there is a reluctance to talk about these issues of income distribution. and one of my friends who was supposed to be here tonight, i talked to him about this, and he said that it's -- i'm going to quote him because it was such a nice line. so he said: i was once told by the head of a prestigious think tank in washington, d.c. that the think tank's board was very unlikely to fund any work that had income or wealth inequali
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
-term investments here. at the same time, we do not start of what has been so much a part of america's -- do not starve so much of what has been a part of america's history, our willingness to invest in the future, and that includes children, poor children, modern infrastructure, basic and blue sky research. when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next few weeks, i think that is going to be a broader challenge we face over the next decade. >> i think we have time for one more question. over here. as the question is coming, i want to say how much we support the president in this fight on ensuring the balance, and the president has been very strong on that issue. >> richard singer. we are a biomedical company that helps nurses and doctors, may collaborate better with social media. we got a small amount of the innovation funding, but it is a broader question about the health care ecosystem. if the company goes under, all the software engineers get new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech, we have a lot of people with ph.d.s, longer-term and specialized types of areas, and we do
be for a number of things. not only are we talking about america, we are talking about the world when we fail to do things we need to do. but for the moment, the issue of the day has to do with an adequate discussion on talks of the american people about just what we need to do regarding this measure. we cannot do everything, and i know that. we cannot stop evil and violence by educating everything, but in my judgment we can and we must do something. failure to do that is a helluva lot more important to me than whether the president and john boehner jump off a fiscal cliff. >> it did yeoman yields back. mr. bishop. -- the gentleman yields back. >> let me first say, mr. scott, that the shawl is specific for you. it is designed to match the wheelchair and the walker you will be given in the senate. in my years as speaker of the house -- [laughter] 1 of the things i had to do is try to enforce the rules we had in quorum in debate. i just want you to know that first ball, i don't ascribe to any special powers to see into the heart of other people so i cannot prescribe motives to anybody or how th
. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewrite
it and change the tax basis, the treasury has to call on corporate america to change the withholding tables. all of us get taxes withheld. if they're going to change what rate i'm going to be taxed at, they're going to have to change that table. that's not an overnight process. certainly, the treasury can't afford to let that go too long because everybody will be underwithheld. they'll get a big tax bill. there will be a riot among the people if that happens. what i'm watching is the treasury. if they get nervous enough, they'll ask them to change the tax tables. so far it looks like they smell a deal and haven't asked for it yet. you think we're going to get a deal? >> i think they may try to push it to the end. the other thing i'm watching for is the 17th when the president is due to take his family to hawaii. i don't think he wants to be in hawaii without a deal. something is going to come up. >> ron, what about you? >> i thought the resignation of senator jim demint, who was a staunch conservative, which was a surprise departure, tells me the republicans in many ways are throwing in the towe
, lake -- [inaudible] actually it's a wonderful part of america. here we have two chinese immigrant families representing america. it's hard to imagine it in reverse from the chinese side. but then they are not in the great society. >> do they take it as an honor? >> and deep. as ambassador locke mentioned they want to claim him and steve chu as part of the greater chinese community when they start talking about human rights or disagree with him on climate change. but nonetheless it's an amazing moments in american history. >> you went over there just before or just after the big confrontation in august of 2011 over the debt crisis here and there is so much concern whether china would continue to surface our debts and by our investment, treasury bond. i was just wondering, what is the mayor theo up our political system is working and whether our economy, whether we are a worthy partner i guess. >> abuse in the top chinese government leaders as they have great confidence in the economy and know how strong it is. they've made statements to the south american leaders that have gone all
to the country at the age of 20. he had nothing with him. but he had one thing nobody had in america. it was extremely quality which was the knowledge of how to die so. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. they did not know how to make machinery, a diet, have the tools, everything was trial and error to create the silk industry. it was our industrial revolution how we get in on the trade? there's so much money to be made in silk. it is hard to appreciate what it meant to the culture back then. before the age of synthetic fabrics and designers fabric was fashion and silk was the ultimate in style to represent prestige, prosperity, a success. america wanted its own silk industry. skinner would say nobody comes over with and ambition not to wear the silk dress. everybody wanted so. he came to the country with knowledge and was a pioneer in the industry. established its. a founding member of the american soccer association and he took that one in this bill into opportunity after opportunity. to the point* he had his own and silk mill. it was a prosperous an entire vil
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